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A Dual-Engine for Early Analysis of Critical Systems

Begutachtete Veröffentlichung in Tagungsband

Autor(en):Aboubakr Achraf El Ghazi, Ulrich Geilmann, Mattias Ulbrich und Mana Taghdiri
In:Workshop on Dependable Software for Critical Infrastructures (DSCI 2011)
Jahr:2011
Preprint/PDF:elghazi-taghdiri-DSCI2010.pdf

Abstract

This paper presents a framework for modeling, simulating, and checking properties of critical systems based on the Alloy language – a declarative, first-order, relational logic with a built-in transitive closure operator. The paper introduces a new dual-analysis engine that is capable of providing both counterexamples and proofs. Counterexamples are found fully automatically using an SMT solver, which provides a better support for numerical expressions than the existing Alloy Analyzer. Proofs, however, cannot always be found automatically since the Alloy language is undecidable. Our engine offers an economical approach by first trying to prove properties using a fully-automatic, SMT-based analysis, and switches to an interactive theorem prover only if the first attempt fails. This paper also reports on applying our framework to Microsoft's COM standard and the mark-and-sweep garbage collection algorithm.

BibTeX

@INPROCEEDINGS{elghazi-taghdiri-DSCI2010,
  author = {Aboubakr Achraf El Ghazi and Ulrich Geilmann and Mattias Ulbrich and Mana
	Taghdiri},
  title = {A Dual-Engine for Early Analysis of Critical Systems},
  booktitle = {Workshop on Dependable Software for Critical Infrastructures (DSCI 2011)},
  year = {2011},
  month = aug,
  address = {Berlin, Germany},
  abstract = {This paper presents a framework for modeling, simulating, and checking
	properties of critical systems based on the Alloy language -- a declarative,
	first-order, relational logic with a built-in transitive closure
	operator. The paper introduces a new dual-analysis engine that is
	capable of providing both \emph{counterexamples} and \emph{proofs}.
	Counterexamples are found fully automatically using an SMT solver,
	which provides a better support for numerical expressions than the
	existing Alloy Analyzer. Proofs, however, cannot always be found
	automatically since the Alloy language is undecidable. Our engine
	offers an economical approach by first trying to prove properties
	using a fully-automatic, SMT-based analysis, and switches to an interactive
	theorem prover only if the first attempt fails. This paper also reports
	on applying our framework to Microsoft's COM standard and the mark-and-sweep
	garbage collection algorithm.}
}